A lack of privacy online and increasingly ubiquitous digital surveillance are omnipresent in our cultural conversations. My research explores how privacy online is a social phenomenon, relying on the context of users and how they feel.
       
     
 At Dartmouth College, I'm working with an NSF-funded interdisciplinary group exploring  d  igital privacy in an age of ubiquitous cameras , and thinking about how technology design, policy and regulation can change to grapple with these new technologies.
       
     
 I've also published on how to make privacy technologies more viscerally engaging, and am an alumnus of New York University's  Privacy Research Group .
       
     
 A lack of privacy online and increasingly ubiquitous digital surveillance are omnipresent in our cultural conversations. My research explores how privacy online is a social phenomenon, relying on the context of users and how they feel.
       
     

A lack of privacy online and increasingly ubiquitous digital surveillance are omnipresent in our cultural conversations. My research explores how privacy online is a social phenomenon, relying on the context of users and how they feel.

 At Dartmouth College, I'm working with an NSF-funded interdisciplinary group exploring  d  igital privacy in an age of ubiquitous cameras , and thinking about how technology design, policy and regulation can change to grapple with these new technologies.
       
     

At Dartmouth College, I'm working with an NSF-funded interdisciplinary group exploring digital privacy in an age of ubiquitous cameras, and thinking about how technology design, policy and regulation can change to grapple with these new technologies.

 I've also published on how to make privacy technologies more viscerally engaging, and am an alumnus of New York University's  Privacy Research Group .
       
     

I've also published on how to make privacy technologies more viscerally engaging, and am an alumnus of New York University's Privacy Research Group.